The Internal Revenue Service released the annual maximum 2024 contribution limits for HSAs under high deductible health plans (HDHPs). For 2024, we will see the largest jump in recent years for contribution limits – mainly due to continued high inflation. The annual limit on HSA contributions for an individual will be $4,150 (up from $3,850 in 2023) and $8,300 for family coverage (up from $7,750 in 2023).  HSA “catch-up” contribution for participants 55 and older, can contribute an extra $1,000 to their HSA, which is the current amount in place for 2023.

Effective January 1, 2024 – Contribution Limits for Health Savings Accounts

Tax Year Individual Coverage Limit Family Coverage Limit
2024 $4,150 $8,300
2023 $3,850 $7,750
2022 $3,650 $7,300
At age 55, members are allowed to contribute an additional $1,000 

What is a HSA? It is a tax-advantaged account, paired with a high-deductible health insurance plan (HDHP), that allows you to save pre-tax dollars for future qualified medical expenses. You can invest the funds in the HSA account tax-free and grow your savings. You own the account, it travels with you if you change jobs, change your health plan, or retire.

 

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The IRS has released the contribution limits for Health Savings Accounts (HSA) for 2023 and the numbers are significantly higher than in prior years, as you can see from the chart below. Knowing these numbers will help employers prepare for open enrollment and think about their contribution levels as well as help employees understand the benefits of contributing to their HSAs.

Tax Year Individual Coverage Limit Family Coverage Limit
2023 $3,850 $7,750
2022 $3,650 $7,300
2021 $3,600 $7,200
At age 55, members are allowed to contribute and additional $1,000 

What is a HSA? It is a tax-advantaged account, paired with a high-deductible health insurance plan (HDHP), that allows you to save pre-tax dollars for future qualified medical expenses. You can invest the funds in the HSA account tax-free and grow your savings. You own the account, it travels with you if you change jobs, change your health plan, or retire.

 

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The new California Law, SB 1375, was signed by Governor Brown on September 22, 2018 and will affect many small firm’s group health insurance. SB 1375 changes the Health Insurance Code to reclassify certain small employer groups as individuals. The affected firms will have to obtain individual health insurance in 2019, rather than the small employer group plans they currently have. Individual health insurance is typically more expensive with less provider network and benefit plan choices than small group plan offerings.

Fortunately, for CalCPA members and their firms, CalCPA Health received certain exemptions from SB 1375, which generally allows us to treat the affected firms as groups, and not as individuals. Commercial carriers (Blue Shield, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem, etc.,) must comply with the new regulations and reclassify these groups as individuals.

SB 1375 defines groups that consist entirely of owners/partners, and/or W-2 employees that are spouses of owner/partners, as not eligible for group health coverage. Even though these entities may be classified as employer/employees by other regulations, (e.g. Workers’ Comp, payroll tax, etc.,) SB 1375 specifically states they do not qualify for group health coverage and may only purchase individual plans.

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