The first step to understanding heart health is to familiarize yourself with the symptoms of a heart attack.

According to Heart.org, the main sign of a heart attack is having discomfort in your chest, usually in the center, that can longer than a few minutes or the pain could come and go. The discomfort could be described as pressure or squeezing and can be painful. Some may feel pain or discomfort in their legs, arms, jaw, neck, or stomach. You may feel lightheaded or experience shortness of breath, cold sweat, or nausea.

Educating yourself on the symptoms of a heart attack may one day help yourself or a loved one. Know the signs and be ready to CALL 911.

February is American Heart Month when it is our call to action to make sure we make sure we take control of our heart health. Over the course of the month, we will provide educational tips and short articles on how to recognize when something isn’t feeling right with your heart, understanding blood pressure, how to reduce the risk heart disease and stroke, and the promotion of healthy habits.

Make it a point to educate yourself on heart health this month so you can start to take care of YOU. Here’s a stat that may make you start thinking about how important it is to take the necessary steps to have a reset of your daily food intake and activities: According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in the United States, someone has a heart attack every 40 seconds and about 805,000 people have a heart attack every year.

By Ron Lang, CEO of CalCPA Health
For more information, email questions@calcpahealth.com.

With doctor office and medical facilities shuttered for much of the second quarter, many were thinking their health insurance rates may not be going up for their 2021 renewal. But most everyone will see increases for next year. Why?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) established mandatory operating margins for health insurance companies. These regulations mean that premium increases are driven almost exclusively by underlying medical expense increases. This is the short answer: Insurance premiums increase because medical expenses are continuing to increase.

 

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